Trip Planner

 

Advanced OptionsOff

Public Participation Plan

Public Participation Plan
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 INTRODUCTION
1.1     Pierce Transit’s Structure, Mission, Vision, and Values
1.2     Pierce Transit’s Public Participation Goals
1.3     Guiding Principles for Public Participation at Pierce Transit
1.4     Regulations and Policies Relevant to Pierce Transit’s Public Participation Plan
2. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION APPROACH
2.1     Public Participation Techniques
3 EVALUATION AND UPDATE OF THE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PLAN
4 EXAMPLES OF PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND OUTREACH
4.1     High Capacity Transit Feasibility Study – Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)
4.2     New Fixed Route Network and Restoration of Service Hours



INTRODUCTION

The Public Participation Plan (PPP) is a guide for Pierce Transit’s ongoing public participation activities. Its purpose is to ensure Pierce Transit utilizes effective means of providing information and receiving input on transportation decisions from the public, including low income, minority, and limited English proficient (LEP) populations, as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states that “no person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

This plan guides Pierce Transit in its efforts to offer early, continuous, and meaningful opportunities for the public to help identify social, economic, and environmental impacts of proposed transportation policies, projects, and initiatives across the Agency. It describes Pierce Transit’s overall goals, guiding principles, and strategic approach. The Public Participation Plan is a living document which will change and grow to help Pierce Transit deepen and sustain its work to engage diverse community members throughout the county. Therefore, Pierce Transit will modify its public participation methods and activities over time, based on ideas and feedback from community members and Pierce Transit’s evaluation of our public participation effectiveness.
 

1.1 Pierce Transit’s Structure, Mission, Vision, and Values

Founded in 1979, Pierce County Public Transportation Benefit Area Corporation (Pierce Transit) is a nationally recognized leader in the public transportation industry. Pierce Transit covers 292 square miles of Pierce County with roughly 70% of the county population. Serving Washington’s second largest county, Pierce Transit provides three types of service, Fixed Route, SHUTTLE paratransit and Vanpools that help get passengers to jobs, schools and appointments.

  • Board of Commissioners Pierce Transit is governed by a ten-member Board of Commissioners. The Board is made up of nine elected officials representing thirteen jurisdictions in Pierce County and one non-voting Union Representative (currently not filled).
  • Executive Finance Committee The Executive Finance Committee (EFC) is comprised of four members of the Board of Commissioners. The Committee serves as a sounding board to the Agency on various policy matters and approves contracts up to its allowed authority established by the Board of Commissioners.
  • The Pierce Transit Community Transportation Advisory Group (CTAG) CTAG is a nine-member advisory group that provides input to the Board of Commissioners. It was chartered to offer an opportunity for community stakeholders to provide input and suggest improvements and recommendations on plans, policies, and services offered by Pierce Transit.

Mission
Pierce Transit improves people’s quality of life by providing safe, reliable, innovative and useful transportation services that are locally based and regionally connected.

Vision
We cultivate a culture of mutual trust and respect with the community and our employees.

Organizational Values
Pierce Transit adopted organizational values that represent the fundamental principles behind Pierce Transit’s Strategic Plan.  The Agency is committed to a culture of service where the following three values guide decisions and actions:

  • Innovation…dedicated to providing our customers with leading-edge services that enhance their transportation experience.
  • Driven…continuously improving our capabilities, work habits, processes, and attitudes by listening to our employees and customers.
  • Responsible…invested in managing the safety, quality, and reliability of our service.


1.2 Pierce Transit’s Public Participation Goals

The Public Participation Plan endeavors to offer meaningful opportunities for the public, including low income, minority, and limited English proficient populations, to be involved in the identification of social, economic, and environmental impacts of proposed transportation decisions by Pierce Transit.

Specific goals and outcomes include:

  • Quality Input and Participation
    Comments received by Pierce Transit are useful, relevant and constructive, contributing to better plans, projects, programs, strategies, and decisions.
  • Consistent Commitment
    Pierce Transit strives to communicate regularly and develop trust with communities, while helping build community capacity to provide public input.
  • Diversity
    Participants represent a range of socioeconomic, ethnic, and cultural perspectives, with representative participants including residents from low income neighborhoods, ethnic communities and residents with limited English proficiency, and other traditionally underserved people.
  • Accessibility
    Every effort is made to ensure that opportunities to participate are physically, geographically, temporally, and linguistically accessible.
  • Relevance
    Issues should be framed clearly and simply such that the significance and potential effect may be understood by the greatest number of participants.
  • Participant Satisfaction
    Pierce Transit should encourage the public to participate in project or initiative related discussions, recognizing that people who take the time to participate feel it is worth the effort to join the discussion and provide feedback.
  • Clarity in Potential for Influence
    The process should clearly identify and communicate where and how participants can have influence and direct impact on decision making.
  • Partnerships
    Pierce Transit develops and maintains partnerships with communities and community-based organizations through the activities described in this Public Participation Plan.
  • Opportunities to Build Trust and Compromise
    Pierce Transit should ensure that discussions, particularly where there are conflicting views, are structured to allow for levels of compromise and consensus that will satisfy the greatest number of community concerns and objectives. Pierce Transit recognizes that processes which allow for consensus to be achieved are critical to enable public support for recommended actions.


1.3 Guiding Principles for Public Participation at Pierce Transit

Pierce Transit’s public involvement procedures are built on the following guiding principles:

  • Flexible
    The engagement process should accommodate participation in a variety of ways and be adjusted as needed.
  • Inclusive
    Pierce Transit should proactively reach out and engage low income, minority and LEP populations from Pierce Transit’s service area so these groups will have an opportunity to participate.
  • Respectful
    All feedback received should be given careful and respectful consideration.
  • Tailored
    Pierce Transit’s public participation methods should be tailored to match local and cultural preferences as much as possible.
  • Proactive and Timely
    Participation methods should allow for early involvement and be ongoing and proactive, so participants can influence Pierce Transit’s decisions.
  • Clear, Focused and Understandable
    Participation methods should have a clear purpose and use for the input, and should be described in language that is easy to understand.
  • Trustworthy
    Information provided should be accurate and trustworthy.
  • Responsive
    Pierce Transit should strive to respond and incorporate appropriate public comments into transportation decisions.
  • Transparent in Impact
    Pierce Transit should communicate the results of the public’s input in terms of the impact on decisions at a broad summary level, providing the major themes, the decisions reached and rationale for the decisions.
  • Authentic and Meaningful
    Pierce Transit should support public participation as a dynamic and meaningful activity that requires teamwork and commitment at all levels of the organization.


1.4 Regulations and Policies Relevant to Pierce Transit’s Public Participation Plan

Pierce Transit functions under a wide variety of federal, state, and local requirements. The list below provides an overview of the basic laws, regulations, and regional policies Pierce Transit operates within.

  • Federal Requirements:
    • Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
    • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
    • Executive Order 13166 – Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency
    • Executive Order 12898 – Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations
    • National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
  • Washington State Requirements:
    • Revised Code of Washington 36.57A – Public Transportation Benefit Areas
    • State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA)
    • Open Public Meetings Act
    • Public Records Act
  • Other Requirements
    • Pierce Transit Code (see Appendix A)

 

2. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION APPROACH

Transportation decision making and project development processes are regulated and follow set procedures, including the need to give the public opportunities to participate. This Public Participation Plan describes participation opportunities generally and includes specific protocols and resources that are designed to facilitate diverse and inclusive public outreach and involvement. The plan is a flexible and evolving document. As necessary, Pierce Transit will revise the PPP based on recurring assessments of successes and/or challenges associated with outreach, as well as suggestions made and the results of public engagement processes.

2.1 Public Participation Techniques

Pierce Transit takes pride in its work to maintain a collaborative relationship with the community and its stakeholders. Pierce Transit’s public outreach effort rests on utilizing multiple communication channels to distribute information to, and solicit input from, affected constituencies. Pierce Transit typically communicates with the public and its customers through one or more of the following methods.

  • Pierce Transit’s Website

    Pierce Transit website, www.PierceTransit.org, is a comprehensive resource for people wanting information about Pierce Transit’s services, programs, projects, and activities. The website offers trip planning which enables a full itinerary for bus, train, and ferry travels in Snohomish, King, and Pierce counties. Many community members are not aware of the volume of information available on Pierce Transit’s website. Informing community members of what is available on the website is an important element of public outreach. Also, public notices of all Pierce Transit’s public meetings, public hearings, and public comment periods are posted on this site. Some programs and projects have dedicated web pages on Pierce Transit’s website that include information about upcoming meetings, fact sheets, and projects and plans. The website includes the ability for users to translate pages into 90 different languages using Google Translate.

  • Customer Comments

    There are multiple ways that individuals can provide verbal or written comments about any subject to us.  Comment Cards are supplied on all buses and SHUTTLE vans, at the Tacoma Dome Station Bus Shop, at Pierce Transit’s Headquarters and at most information outlets where bus schedule information is stocked.  These cards have a postage-paid business reply mailer and are printed in English and Spanish.  Comment Cards should be available at any public participation event.  The Pierce Transit website has multiple mechanisms to receive comments including a comment form, an email button that automatically begins an email to the Agency, comment forms on project web pages, and the Customer Service phone number where staff will take comments over the phone.  That same phone number and/or email address is printed on almost all printed materials, bus stop signs, and passenger vehicles.  

  • Press Releases and Media Relations

    Pierce Transit distributes press releases as appropriate on events and other important information to news media. Press releases are posted on www.PierceTransit.org. In addition, Pierce Transit’s Public Relations Officer is available to speak with reporters regarding various topics.

  • Printed Materials

    Pierce Transit produces publications as needed such as the Report to the Community, The Bus Stops Here (TBSH) route and schedule book, maps, rider alerts (see Appendix C), brochures, rack cards, and posters and makes them available to anyone. These publications include technical and policy information and often use visualization techniques to enhance understanding of transit planning. Materials are translated into other languages, as needed (see Appendix B). All publications are available free of charge.

  • Surveys

    Pierce Transit may conduct surveys in print, by telephone and online to collect public opinion on specific topics or issues. Depending on the data being collected, Pierce Transit considers the methodologies that provide statistically valid data when possible. Pierce Transit also considers strategies for letting people know that surveys are available in multiple languages, to increase the response rate from low income, minority, and LEP populations.

  • Telephone Information Line <

    Pierce Transit’s phone system offers pre-recorded information about bus routes that may detour during snowstorms, and location and service hours for our Bus Shop.

  • Newsletters

    Newsletters or Project Fact Sheets are developed and used throughout the public participation process to provide information on how people may share their comments with Pierce Transit. 

     
  • On-Board Announcements 

    Pierce Transit utilizes on-board announcements to broadcast audio and scrolling announcements as needed. Topics include items such as detours, route and schedule changes, and public meeting notices.

  • Mailings and Email Lists

    Pierce Transit regularly provides information about its services through mass mailings to targeted households near its routes.

  • Social Media

    Pierce Transit uses Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to distribute information and interact with a wider audience on a near daily basis. The Agency may utilize other social media mediums as the technology changes.

  • Paid Advertisements

    To promote its services or collect public comments, the Agency may place paid advertisements in local printed or online publications or websites.

  • Focus Groups

    Focus groups are utilized to discover the attitudes of the public for complex projects, controversial issues or where large Title VI groups exists.

  • Community Investment Teams

    The purpose of the Community Investment Team (CIT) is to bring together several parties with a vested interest in the success of demonstration projects. Collectively, the team guides the design of the service innovation, partners on critical needs that must be met to deliver service (e.g., service routing, marketing, communications and outreach, funding), and establishes a clear scope for the demonstration project and evaluation of the project. Membership of the CIT is composed of several partnering organizations (e.g., cities, chambers, colleges, retailers, hospitals, and senior centers).

  • Transit Center Outreach

    Pierce Transit, on occasion, will proactively staff transit centers to distribute pertinent information to riders.

  • Community Outreach Booths
    Occasionally, Pierce Transit staffs tables or booths at community events and public gathering spaces to raise awareness of services and/or promote ridership.
  • Open Houses

    Open houses are informal settings where the public can obtain information about Pierce Transit’s plan, service, or project. The public receives information from exhibits and staff, and they are encouraged to give opinions, make comments, and state preferences to staff, orally or in writing. Informal presentations, slide shows, and one-on-one discussions take place continuously throughout the event. The number of locations for open houses depends on the project and audience. Staff makes every effort to be as inclusive as possible and to schedule open houses at convenient locations along bus routes.

  • Virtual Open Houses

    Project updates, interactions, and follow up of a virtual open house are all done on the internet. People get the experience of a physical open house without the travel or time restraints.

  • Board Meetings

    The Board of Commissioners meets the second Monday of each month at 4:00 p.m. at Pierce Transit's Training Center, Rainier Conference Room, 3720 – 96th ST SW, Lakewood, Washington. These meetings are open to the public and include an opportunity for the public to comment on any item relating to transit. The following section describes what the public can expect in terms of notification, agendas, location, and visualization techniques at these meetings.

    • Public Notification

      Pursuant to Board-Approved Resolution, Pierce Transit Board meetings are held monthly on a fixed day, time and location unless cancelled.  Agendas are distributed and posted to the Agency’s website (www.piercetransit.org) prior to each meeting per Washington State law.

    • Agendas

      Agendas with supporting materials are sent electronically to the Board of Commissioners, parties of record and posted on Pierce Transit’s website in advance of the meeting pursuant to Washington State Law. Agendas include information for the following items: a) special accommodations for the hearing impaired; b) accommodations for those eligible under the American Disability Act (ADA); and c) Registered SHUTTLE customers who wish to attend the hearing.

    • Public Hearing

      A public hearing may be part of the Board of Commissioners’ meeting when required by law, a state or federal program, service or fare changes, or in exceptional circumstances these hearings can be special meetings. The purpose of the hearings is to accept public comment relevant to a particular topic. Advance public notification, meeting the legal requirement, is advertised requesting public participation. Pierce Transit’s Code Ch. 1.60.010 B states: “Pierce Transit will publicize the hearing in a major newspaper with general circulation in the urbanized area of Pierce County and other newspapers which are directed at specifically affected groups. Legal notices will be advertised at least 7 calendar days and not more than 14 calendar days in advance of the hearing date.”

    • Public Comment

      A public comment period is part of each Board meeting. Time limits are set on public comments. Written comments can be forwarded to Pierce Transit headquarters or the public comment can occur in person during the comment period.

    • Visualization Techniques

      Pierce Transit uses visualization techniques such as maps, charts, graphs, illustrations, presentations and videos at all types of meetings, including board meetings, to explain concepts behind actions and decision-making. Pierce Transit may also use handouts and posters to display visual information. Pierce Transit’s boardroom is equipped with computers, projectors, and sound systems for displaying visual and audio information. Pierce Transit uses style guides for data presentation and PowerPoint presentations to present a consistent, streamlined, and easy to understand visual message.

    • Meeting Times, Locations, and Accessibility

      All Pierce Transit public meetings, including committee meetings, open houses and other events are conducted in facilities that are accessible to persons with disabilities and to people who rely on public transit. Public meetings, such as open houses, community outreach events or hearings may be held at various times and locations throughout the county to allow people with traditional and non-traditional schedules to attend. Pierce Transit maintains an accessible website.



3. EVALUATION AND UPDATE OF THE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PLAN

Pierce Transit’s Public Participation Plan is intended to be a living document that will be informed by current and future practices, successes and lessons learned. Pierce Transit will continue to adapt and modify its public participation practices over time.

4. EXAMPLES OF PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND OUTREACH

The following is a summary of two examples of different projects that describes Pierce Transit’s public involvement and outreach programs. These summaries demonstrate the steps each project or service takes to ensure out Title VI goals, guidelines and procedures are being met.

4.1 High Capacity Transit Feasibility Study – Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

Pierce Transit has conducted many public involvement and outreach activities since project initiation in spring 2017, including specific efforts to reach out to low income, minority, and limited English proficient populations. Three rounds of public open house meetings occurred at several locations along the proposed BRT corridor in September 2017, November 2017 and March 2018, coinciding with key decision points during the study. In addition to these open houses, Pierce Transit has participated in meetings with many community groups, such as the Eastside Neighborhood Council and Spring Hill Safe Streets. A list of activities where Pierce Transit presented and discussed the project were captured.

Purpose

  • Awareness: Inform the public of Pierce Transit’s feasibility study of implementing Bus Rapid Transit along a 14.4-mile corridor on Pacific Avenue.
  • Education: Educate the public on the benefits of BRT and how they can get involved.
  • Input: Provide opportunities for the public to offer comments and feedback regarding this new transportation option along Pierce Transit’s busiest corridor.
  • Decision-making: Collect feedback and comments from project website, public meetings and online platforms.

People

  • General Public: Offer opportunity for riders and non-riders alike to comment on conceptual plan development.
  • Key Stakeholders: Engage Community Councils throughout the service area for input and assistance reaching out to their communities. 
  • Community Groups: Solicit viewpoints of local community services throughout the service area.
  • Jurisdictions: Present to various city councils, planning commissions, and other public entities to solicit input and seek feedback.

Methods

  • Open House: Pierce Transit hosted nine open houses where displays, handouts and other materials were used to explore how the corridor would benefit from BRT service. Attendees gave feedback in both oral and written form -  on paper and via the project website which was available on a laptop at meetings. Meetings were held in accessible locations throughout the service area to ensure geographic equity and translation services were available as needed.
  • Project Website: Pierce transit created a project website where users could provide feedback in a narrative fashion.
  • Brochures: Printed brochures/rider alerts (see Appendix C) were created to provide the public with information about the public meetings and to solicit feedback via the project website. Over 5,000 were distributed for each open house meeting.
  • Fact Sheets: Public fact sheets (see Appendix A) were prepared in English and Spanish and were distributed at Centro Latino in Tacoma.
  • Displays and Exhibits: Maps and presentation boards were posted at public meetings to share information and request feedback.
  • Advertisement: Notices for public meetings were published in local newspapers and on social media, including Facebook posts in Spanish, the predominant non-English language spoken in the study area homes. On-board audio announcements regarding the open houses were provided in English and Spanish. All meeting advertising materials include a footnote regarding translation services, written in the top seven non-English languages spoken within the Pierce County PTBA (Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Tagalog, Korean, Khmer, and German).



4.2 New Fixed Route Network and Restoration of Service Hours

Pierce Transit spent much of 2016 conducting a comprehensive analysis of its existing fixed route bus service network. By holding open houses and seeking out engagement online, Pierce Transit reached out to the public throughout 2016 for ideas about how to improve existing services and to find out what new routes or services riders would like to see. The service routes previously in place were designed nearly four decades ago, and Pierce Transit’s goal was to design a new plan that reflected the present needs of current and future South Sound transit riders. Of the nearly 1,000 responses received, the two most-requested improvements were increased frequency and a longer span of service on weekdays.

On December 12, 2016, Pierce Transit’s Board of Commissioners voted unanimously in favor of implementing a more efficient routing plan that delivered on these requests. The result was more frequent bus service and service later on weekdays throughout the Pierce Transit service area.

These service expansions, which took effect on March 12, 2017, included the restoration of 35,000 hours of transit service, added 30-minute peak and mid-day service on nearly all urban routes and many non-urban routes. Nightly service was also extended until 10:00 p.m. on many routes. The restructured system provides more direct bus routes with faster service between locations as well as fewer overlapping routes along the same path.

In the September 2017 service change, Pierce Transit restored approximately 10,000 additional service hours. A great many of these hours, were directed at weekend service and improving on-time performance. Observations of the March 2017 service change, as well as continued feedback, helped guide Pierce Transit’s further developments for September.

The expansion has been dubbed a “restoration of service,” serving as a reminder of all the cutbacks Pierce Transit riders endured during the Great Recession. During this time, Pierce Transit was forced to decommission almost one-third of its service. Before the economic slow-down, Pierce Transit provided 622,000 hours of service a year. That number dropped as low as 416,000 in 2013. By the end of 2017, more frequent service and later hours brought that number up to 500,130 annual service hours.

Pierce Transit developed a Public Outreach Plan (see Appendix D) for the New Fixed Route Network and Restoration of Service Hours which contained the following elements:

Purpose

  • Awareness: Make public aware of the budgeted service hours being restored to the system and how they can provide input on those hours would be utilized.
  • Education: Educate the public on the service strategies being developed and allow opportunity for them to view service concept(s) designed by the consultant team and Pierce Transit staff.
  • Input: Provide opportunities for the public to offer comments and opinions on how they would like Pierce Transit to prioritize service enhancements.
  • Decision-making: Collect feedback and comments from project website, public meetings and written letters for Board review prior to Public Hearing.

People

  • General Public: Offer opportunity for riders and non-riders alike to comment on where they wanted Pierce Transit to prioritize transit investments.
  • Key Stakeholders: Engage Community Councils throughout the service area for input and assistance reaching out to their communities. 
  • Community Groups: Solicit viewpoints of local community services throughout the service area
  • Jurisdictions: Present to various city councils, planning commissions, and other public entities to solicit input and seek feedback.

Methods

  • Open house: Pierce Transit hosted six open houses where displays, handouts and other materials were used to explore alternatives for hour restorations, potential route realignments, and service investment concepts. Attendees gave feedback in both oral and written form -  on paper and via the project website which was available via a laptop at meetings. Meetings were held in accessible locations throughout the service area to ensure geographic equity and translation services were available as needed.
  • Project Website: Pierce Transit created a project website where users could provide feedback in a narrative fashion via a “Feedback” tab or by using the “Build Your Own System” web tool to prioritize various service enhancements (e.g., more frequent weekday or weekend service; more frequent bus service to commuter rail stops) and other amenities (e.g., additional shelters; improved lighting at bus stops).
  • Public hearing: Hearing consisted of summary of the various enhancement strategies, what we had heard from the public so far, alternatives for service restorations, and reactions to the preferred alternative (11/14/16).
  • Brochures: Printed brochures/ rider alerts (see Appendix E) were created to provide the public with information about the public meetings and to solicit feedback via the project website and through the “Build Your Own System” web tool (see Appendix E). Brochures were distributed on all Pierce Transit fixed route and SHUTTLE coaches as well as at locations where Pierce Transit schedule information is available (e.g., grocery stores, libraries, schools, and hospitals).
  • Displays and exhibits: Maps, presentation boards, and general information on the analysis posted at public meetings to share information and request feedback.
  • A-Boards: Placed at all transit center and park & ride locations notifying the public of public meetings and how to provide input.
  • Print and Online Ads: Ads placed in local newspapers as well as via social media (e.g., Facebook and Twitter).
  • Radio and Television: Details of the analysis and requests for feedback presented on Pierce County TV and TV Tacoma as well as radio ads on local radio stations. Routine press releases to update status and encourage public participation.
  • Presentations: Targeted outreach to Pierce County Chief Appointed Officials, City of Tacoma Planning Commission, North Tacoma Neighborhood Council, New Tacoma Neighborhood Council, South Tacoma Neighborhood Council, Regional Access Mobility Partnership.
  • Media Coverage: Coverage of the analysis, request for participation and information on the project website covered via the Tacoma News Tribune, Puyallup Herald, and South Sound Talks. 
  • Vehicle Posters: Interior posters placed on Pierce Transit buses and SHUTTLE vehicles.

LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix A                 Pierce Transit Code – Public Hearing Procedures
Appendix B                  BRT Fact Sheet in English and Spanish
Appendix C                  BRT Open House Rider Alert in English and Spanish
Appendix D                 Destination 2040 Brochure in English and Spanish
Appendix E                  Rider Alert 2016 Route Analysis – Proposed Changes
Appendix F                  Rider Alert Route Analysis - Public Meetings

 





Appendix A
Pierce Transit Code -Public Hearing Procedures

PIERCE TRANSIT CODE
Chapter 1.60 - PUBLIC HEARING PROCEDURES
1.60.010 - Legal communication requirements.

  1. Pierce Transit will hold a public hearing when any fare changes lasting longer than a 6-month demonstration period are proposed or any major service changes are proposed. A major service change shall be defined as any change in service lasting 12 months or more on any individual route that would add or eliminate twenty percent or more of the route revenue miles or twenty percent or more of the route revenue hours. All major service changes and all non-demonstration, system-wide, fare changes will be subject to an equity analysis which includes an analysis of adverse effects on minority and low income populations.
  2. Pierce Transit will publicize the hearing in a major newspaper with general circulation in the urbanized area of Pierce County and other newspapers which are directed at specifically affected groups. Legal notices will be advertised at least 7 calendar days and not more than 14 calendar days in advance of the hearing date.
  3. eyond these legal notice requirements, both before and after a public hearing, Pierce Transit will take other appropriate steps to alert riders, notify the community, and inform staff and other stakeholders of any fare or major service changes. Along with any legal notice, Pierce Transit will publish the legal notice and the proposed fare change(s) or major service change(s) on Pierce Transit's website.
(Res. No. 14-008, § 1, 3-10-2014)
1.60.020, 1.60.030 - Reserved.
Editor's note— Res. No. 14-0008, § 1, adopted March 10, 2014, repealed §§ 1.60.020, 1.60.030, which pertained to public hearings, beyond legal requirements. See Code Comparative Table for complete derivation.
© 2020 Pierce Transit, All Rights Reserved. Site Design and Development by SiteCrafting.

Trip Planner Help

Trip Planner Tips - Entering Locations

To create a trip plan you need to enter both a starting location (origin) and an ending location (destination). For information about stops, schedules, or service at a specific location, you only need to enter one location.

The Trip Planner recognizes most street intersections and addresses as well as many landmarks in Pierce, King, and Snohomish Counties. If what you entered is not immediately recognized, the Trip Planner will offer you a list of options. You can choose one of the options, but if your intended location is not there, select the "Revise Original Entries" link to return to the entry page and change the entries you have already made.

Addresses

  • You don't need to type in the city along with the address. The Trip Planner shows the possible city names as options if needed. City names are based on zip codes.
  • You don't need to type in St., Street, Ave., or Avenue, or similar street types. The Trip Planner shows the possible alternatives as options if needed. (Example: type 110 Jones instead of 110 Jones Boulevard.)
  • You don't need to type in the directional designations for streets, but if a direction name is part of a street name, you should include it. (Example: type 1000 Main instead of 1000 S Main. But type 1000 West Viewmont for 1000 West Viewmont Way W.)
  • Some streets and addresses are unknown to the Trip Planner. You may need to enter another nearby location, such as an intersection or a landmark.
  • You should not enter the suite number or apartment number.  Just the house number and street name (Example: type in 401 Broadway instead of 401 Broadway Avenue Suite 800).

Intersections

  • The "&" symbol is the only character used between two street names to show an intersection. (Examples: 1st & B, James & Madison)
  • You don't need to type in the city. The Trip Planner shows the possible city names as options if needed. City names are based on zip codes.
  • You don't need to type in St., Street, Ave., or Avenue, or similar street types. The Trip Planner shows the possible alternatives as options if needed. (Example: type Conifer & Jones instead of Conifer Circle & Jones Boulevard.)
  • You don't need to type in the directional designations for streets, but if a direction name is part of a street name, you should include it. (Example: type 3rd & Main instead of 3rd S & S Main. But type 34th & West Viewmont for 34th W & West Viewmont Way W.)
  • Some streets are unknown to the Trip Planner. You may need to enter another nearby intersection or a landmark.

Landmarks

Government Sites: Pierce County Health Dept, Pierce Co Sheriffs Office, Tacoma City Hall

Major Commercial Sites: Tacoma Mall, Sheraton Hotel

Transportation Facilities: Sea-Tac Airport, Greyhound Bus Depot

Schools & Colleges: Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma Community College

Sports & Leisure: Cheney Stadium, Pt Defiance Zoo

Medical Facilities: Group Health, Tacoma General Hospital


 

Email Route


 

Report Issue With This Planned Trip